EASE

Anxiety is normal—we all experience it from time to time. But if anxiety is intense, out of proportion to the threat, or long-lasting, it can interfere with our well-being. It can also impact students’ ability to learn and their success in school. It’s important to teach students coping skills and how to manage everyday anxiety.  Everyday Anxiety Strategies for Educators (EASE) does just that.

EASE was developed by the Ministry of Children and Family Development in collaboration with B.C. educators and many other partners and subject matter experts across the province. It has been used in classrooms throughout B.C. since 2019.

EASE is an online course for educators and a collection of evidence-informed, curriculum-aligned classroom resources for teaching K–12 students effective everyday anxiety management skills. EASE includes strategies for students to help them cope with everyday anxiety while contributing to the mental health literacy of educators.

EASE Everyday Anxiety Strategies for Educators

EASE is available at no cost to B.C. educators and the classroom resources are accessible through the completion of an online, self-paced professional development course. There are two online courses available: one for grades K–7 and the other for grades 8–12.

The EASE classroom resources and lesson plans are designed to fit into existing school routines and practices—to benefit all students. While they are designed for classroom teachers, they can be adapted for use by school counsellors, administrators and support staff. Some EASE resources have also been adapted for parents and caregivers for use at home.

EASE aligns well with the B.C. government’s ongoing commitment to promotion, prevention and early intervention resources for the mental health and well-being of children and youth, their families, and the educators who support them. This commitment is reflected in the Ministry of Children and Family Development’s strategic priorities, the provincial mental health and addictions strategy, A Pathway to Hope, and the Ministry of Education’s Mental Health in Schools Strategy.

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